Tag Archives: VisualAssignments

What Does Jack “Settig” Neff Keep in his Bag?

This is the What’s in Your Bag assignment, worth three points.

The first thing Jack Neff makes sure he has in his bag is his change of clothes. After his day job as a grocer, Jack sets out into the night and transforms into the hero of his novels, Jack Settig, a cunning tracker and mystery-solver who despises the scum of the city.
The first thing Jack Neff makes sure he has in his bag is his change of clothes. After his day job as a grocer, Jack sets out into the night and transforms into the hero of his novels, Jack Settig, a cunning tracker and mystery-solver who despises the scum of the city. For Jack, the look makes the man.
Flask
Jack Neff doesn’t drink, but Jack Settig runs on drink. Each night before hitting the streets, Jack fills his flask to the brim with premium scotch whiskey, Glenfiddich when available, and never leaves a drop.
As Jack Neff, the journal serves as a notebook for his novels. For Jack Settig, its a log of his current cases, suspects, and other various notes of interest from his nights on the streets.
As Jack Neff, the journal serves as a notebook for his novels. For Jack Settig, its a log of his current cases, suspects, and other various notes of interest from his nights on the streets.
Jack Neff has never smoked. Jack Settig is a chain-smoker who likes the finer tobaccos He rolls his own cigarettes each night before hitting the town.
Jack Neff has never smoked. Jack Settig is a chain-smoker who likes the finer tobaccos. He rolls his own cigarettes each night before hitting the town.

 

A Flipped Side of the Moon

This is the Classic Album Makeover assignment which calls for a visual rethinking of a famous album cover. It is worth 2 1/2 points.

I’ll admit, I bet everyone thinks of this album cover for this assignment. It’s simple, iconic, and has been interpreted beyond belief for seemingly hundreds of years. Dark side of the moon remix

I made a point of trying to keep this simple. Trying to much with this sort of iconic image, loading it up with all sorts of bells and whistles, seemed the wrong sort of move. My goal was to add something significant-but-subtle to the image to spark a visual reappraisal of just what’s going on here.

It probably goes without saying for this cover: I was always going to flip it, reverse it, mirror it, something. When given a triangle and a few lines on a black background, almost anything is possible, but the obvious potential for easy, geometrical fun was too hard to pass up. I settled on flipping the triangle, keeping the beam of light in the same direction. I then had fun with GIMP’s smudge tool to create a jagged, lighting-like effect as the light passes through the triangle and refracts. My initial plan was to change the background to a night sky instead of the plain black backdrop, but I couldn’t find one that wasn’t cheesy.

So while this is admittedly something of a simple album cover makeover, I think its simplicity is where it shines.

 

Visualizing Emerson’s Words

This is the Poetry Art assignment calling for a visual landscape to be applied to the text of a poem to better explain its meaning. It’s a three point assignment.

I’ve been reading Ralph Waldo Emerson’s Nature as of late, so I decided to pull a quote from there as my de facto “poem.” This is mainly because I had this image in my head to begin with and I was struggling with creating something worthwhile for another poem. Considering the emphasis here is on visuals, not the poem itself,  I hope this is not a problem

.emerson quote pic

I’m a softy for the American romantics, so naturally Emerson’s flowery perusings are my cup of tea. In Nature, he writes “To speak truly, few adult persons can see nature. Most persons do not see the sun. At least they have a very superficial seeing (25). Immediately after reading this passage and my selected passage, I mentally conjured an image of a child stunned and amazed at sunlight while an old man barely notices. I played around with the image a bit and came up with this admittedly somewhat creepy-looking collage.

I absolutely love how the light shines straight through the forehead of the child, but I fought GIMP left and right trying to crop everything around him while keeping the light effects. It was a pain, and it’s still very noticeable. Alas, playing around with color thresholds, blendings, and gradients still left me with some interesting visuals. I particularly love the tired, old eyes representing Emerson’s notion that adults fail to see the true beauty of nature as children do. It really fits beautifully.

I picked the dimensions for the image as I did in the hopes that I could make this a wallpaper for my phone, but initial test-runs have not been flattering. Most people are creeped out by the boy’s face. Oh well! I like it.

 

Stenciling an Illuminated Tapestry

This is the Back to the Basics assignment that calls for a “stenciling” effect to be applied to an image. It is a two star assignment.

darthvader stencil
Luke, I am technically a stencil

Well this was interesting. I’ve always been a fan of this style of art, however one chooses to label it. That likely has something to do with my 12 year old infatuation with Sin City all those years ago (yeah I’m warped, I know). I’m not sure I like “stencil” as the description of the style however, at least as far as the example images for the assignment as concerned. I certainly get it and have no other better term for it, but when I think of stencil, I think of something like…

 

That’s a bit different than the example images, though it is absolutely in the same vein. Most of the examples are more of a stylized, comic book-like black and white color scheme. Sure enough, when I was playing around with GIMP, their “stencil” visual option hardly affected the image, leaving a rather clean-looking greyscaled image, but nothing in the way of a stenciled look. After playing around with color thresholds and inversions however, I finally found a look that I liked.

IMG_1138
I started here…
Tapestry stencil look
…and ended here

My original image was simply the tapestry, but once I realized the effect I was getting with my filters, I quickly realized the street sign would look awesome. Basically everything light surrounded by dark gives the effect here, and balance is extremely important in creating a coherent image. As is visible here, the lamp behind the tapestry, clearly visible in the original image, is merely an indistinguishable mess of white in the middle of the image. There’s just enough going on around it that I don’t think it ruins anything, but the comparison is greatly noticeable.